On this Day in History Quilts 2013: January 31

Treasures from Zanesville.
On this day in 1872 author Zane (changed from his given name—Pearl) Grey was born in Zanesville, Ohio. Grey’s most famous novel Riders of the Purple Sage is the tale of a man transformed from a weak easterner to a strong adventurer shaped by the rugged environment and culture of the American West.
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This T-Pattern quilt was also made in Zanesville, Ohio in the late 19th century. Three generations of women worked on the quilt: Mrs. Adam Racquet (mother), Mrs. Peter Gobel (daughter) and Mrs. David Gobel (granddaughter –in law?). Family members inherited the quilt and documented it (along with two others made by this group) during the North Carolina Quilt Project in 1985.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/author-zane-grey-is-born

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

On this Day in History Quilts 2013: January 30

Who Was that Masked Man Anyway?
On this day in 1933 the first episode of The Lone Ranger debuted on Detroit radio station WXYZ. The show opened with Rossini’s William Tell Overture and the shout “Hi-yo, Silver! Away!” The masked ex-Texas Ranger and his faithful Native American companion Tonto (whose inauthentic dialog included lines like “You betchum”)  fought of justice in the American Old West. The show’s audience grew to over 20 million Americans by 1939.

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This pictorial quilt titled “Wild, Wild West” was made by Willoa Stockton Shults of Boerne, Texas in 1985. Mrs. Shults notes this about her design: “The main figure represents the mainstay of Texas symbolism–the cowboy and his faithful companion–the horse. His nemesis–the Indian–is inferred from the arrows. The background represents the terrain of West Texas with the Guadalupe Mountains in the distance.” Shults’ quilt was documented during the Texas Quilt Search and included in the 1990 book Lone Stars: A Legacy of Texas Quilts, Vol. II, 1936-1986 by Karoline Patterson Bresenhan and Nancy O’Bryant Puentes.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-lone-ranger-debuts-on-detroit-radio
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lone_Ranger

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

On this Day in History Quilts 2013: January 29

Aloha Oe
On this day in 1891 Liliuokalani is proclaimed Queen of Hawaii, the last monarch to rule the islands. Liliuokalani took over for her brother after his death. She was ousted by revolutionaries only two years later. Liliuokalani spent most of the rest of her life in the United States and composed many popular Hawaiian songs, including “Aloha Oe,” which means “Farewell to Thee.”

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This now-faded blue and white wholecloth applique beauty, titled Ka’ahumanu or Lei O Ka’ahumanu was made by Eme Mahikoa in 1899 in the town of Kawaihao on Kauai Island in Hawaii. It is entirely hand made and features a pink backing fabric. The quilt was documented by a family member of Mahikoa as part of the Hawaiian Quilt Research Project in 1996.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/liliuokalani-proclaimed-queen-of-hawaii
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CjZyZ8IuSzw (Aloha Oe on Hawaiian guitar with photos of Hawaii….relaxing)

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

On this Day in History Quilts 2013: January 28

We Are the World, We Are the Quilters.
On this day in 1985 American music producer Quincy Jones recorded the pop hit We Are the World with a group of top pop stars, including the song’s writers, Michael Jackson and Lionel Ritchie. The recording was made immediately following the American Music Awards ceremony, at a studio nearby. Over 7 million copies of the record were sold, raising more than $60 million for African famine relief.

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This quilt, titled We Are the Quilters, was made by Cynthia St. Charles of Billings, Montana, for the Quilt Alliance’s 2011 contest, “Alliances: People, Patterns, Passion.” The quilt includes dozens of tiny, handmade worry dolls. St. Charles writes in her artist’s statement: “While contemplating the theme, “Alliances,” I imagined all the quilters in the world joining hands. I wondered how many times they would encircle the earth if they did. I thought, ‘what a happier, gentler world it would be if all the world’s quilters could join hand in solidarity.’”

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/american-recording-artists-gather-to-record-quotwe-are-the-worldquot

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Making time for creativity


Time for creativity.

How to find the time.  It’s the million dollar question isn’t it?

I know for myself, finding time is a priority. Not just because quilting it’s what I do, but because I have to do it. It comes with being an artist or any kind. Whether you write, quilt, paint or cook, making time for something you are passionate about is good for you soul.

Screen Shot 2013-01-24 at 9.43.09 AMWhat is the minimum time needed for creativity?

How do I do it? Many of you know that at one point in my life, “15 Minutes” was my life mantra for creativity. As a new mother, I found out quickly -but in a very good way- what people meant when they said, “Time? Wait until you have child! You won’t have time!” In those days I discovered  that 15 minutes-a-day to be creative, was just enough time to keep me connected to my creative process. Amazingly, I could still do everything else I had to do! Sometimes it had nothing to do with quilt making. Sometimes it was taking 15 minutes to make something new, fresh and delicious for myself and family. Sometimes it was coloring with her, or stacking blocks…or writing in her baby journal.

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Make a boundary around it.

Be firm and selfish about that block of time.

It’s easy to get overwhelmed by life’s responsibilities but it’s worth it to find a morsel of time that you can give your self to be creative and freethinking each day.

See how TIME actually includes “ME” in it?

Permission granted!

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Overwhelmed? Are you organized?

I get overwhelmed when my studio is  a mess…(which is usually) …But ~ I find when I clean, I get a HUGE boost of creative energy. Perhaps that is why I make a “great hot mess” of my studio!  So for starters, get rid of clutter. Take 15 minutes to tackle big cleaning projects, walk away and comeback alter for another small block of time. Small amounts of time used on overwhelming tasks makes them more manageable and sometimes even fun!

FUN? Cleaning?

As you clean, or go about your day, make a list of projects,or sketch out an idea, so you can come back LATER, and have FUN with your ideas!Screen Shot 2013-01-24 at 9.21.43 AM

Visualize your time, through out the day.

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Think about HOW you will use that time the next day, so when you sit down to work, you are ready to go! I dream quilts, come up with great ideas in the shower, and while sitting in traffic…( I do live in NYC after all… most great thinking is done in traffic)

Keep a pocket diary in your purse or briefcase to capture those ideas. Keep a good pen and pencil on hand too, I prefer sharpies! A little COLOR can take you a long way!

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Even if your 15 MINUTES is plain old, “sit down and put your feet up,” have stack of books and magazines available for inspiration.

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One you start to think about  time in smaller increments during the day, you will be surprised at how you DO have the time to be creative.

Be gentle, Be confident, Create!

Victoria Findlay Wolfe is a New York City based quilter, fabric designer, and author of 15 Minutes of Play (C&T publishing), president of the NYC Metro Mod Quilters, board member of the nonprofit Quilt Alliance and since 2009 has run several community drives with BumbleBeansBASICS. Born and raised on a farm in Minnesota, Victoria’s passion for quilt making runs deep in her midwestern roots. She credits her quilting influences to her grandmother’s double knit crazy quilts that kept her warm growing up. Her biggest supporters are her loving husband, Michael and daughter, Beatrice. Follow her main blog at:  http://bumblebeansinc.blogspot.com/

and her popular teaching site:  http://www.15minutesplay.com/

On this Day in History Quilts 2013: January 25

Diamonds, decoys and dreams of Baltimore.
On this day in 1905 in Pretoria, South Africa, a 3,106-carat diamond weighing 1.33 pounds was discovered. It was named the Cullinan diamond after the mine’s owner. It was presented to Britain’s King Edward VII as a gift, and to ensure it’s safe passage from Africa to London a decoy diamond was sent first with heavy security; meanwhile the real Cullinan traveled separately in a plain box.

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Teresa Stoller of Flagler Beach, Florida made this small wall quilt titled “Diamonds Are a Girl’s Best Friend” in 2011 for the Quilt Alliance’s annual quilt contest.  Teresa wrote this about her quilt: “This quilt is my playful interpretation of the theme People, Pattern, Passions. I was inspired by wonderful memoires of attending Baltimore Orioles’ baseball games at Camden Yards with my husband and two children. As I looked around the stadium, I saw those 47,000 heads as a sea of colorful circular shapes ….. big, small, dark, light, rough, smooth ….. all different, yet the same: a repetition of happy circles! … I invite you to gaze into my quilt, hear the cheering fans, smell the popcorn and stadium hot dogs, enjoy the game and revel in the beauty of that perfectly cut field….”

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/worlds-largest-diamond-found

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

On this Day in History Quilts 2013: January 24

On my honor, I will do my best.
On this day in 1908 Robert Baden-Powell’s handbook, the first volume of Scouting for Boys, was published, launching the Boy Scouts movement in England. The American version of the Boy Scouts was founded as a result of an inspirational event in England in 1909. The U. S. founder of the Boy Scouts, William Boyce, lost his way in the London fog and a young scout came to his rescue, refusing a tip for his good deed.

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There are a number of Boy Scout related quilts in The Quilt Index. This One Patch quilt was made by members of Cub Scout Pack 867 of Franconia, Michigan with the help of Patricia A. Kirk. The quilt was made for President Gerald Ford and was personally presented to him in 1976. The quilt is now owned by the Gerald Ford Museum in Grand Rapids, Michigan and was documented as part of the Michigan Quilt Project in 1985.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/boy-scouts-movement-begins
http://www.usscouts.org/advance/boyscout/bsoathlaw.asp

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

On this Day in History Quilts 2013: January 23

Gifts from Canada and Alabama.
On this day in 1922 in Toronto, Canada the first insulin injection was given to a 14-year-old boy with diabetes. Before this discovery diabetics were treated with a special low carbohydrate diet, which prolonged their life by about a year.

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This Square in a Square hand pieced and hand quilted simple beauty was made in the 1920’s by Ellna Lorene Harris in Guntersville, Alabama. According to her granddaughter, who inherited the quilt, Ellna was a tall woman and made the quilt very long for her comfort. From this record: “Ellna was a very good Christian woman. Had no children. Died of diabetes.” The quilt was documented in 2010 as part of the Florida Quilt Project, the newest contributor to The Quilt Index.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/insulin-injection-aids-diabetic-patient
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_diabetes

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Meet a Member: Patricia Hobbs

On This Day in History Quilts posts will return tomorrow! 

Alliance member Patricia Hobbs of MacomPat Hobbs photob, Illinois was our Grand Prize winner in the recent 2012 membership drawing. Pat won the Amazing Aurifil Cotton Thread Suitcase, with 216 gorgeous colors. I’d like to take this opportunity to launch a blog series I’m calling Meet a Member, where we’ll spotlight some of the generous, talented folks in our community of members. Our members include many who quilt, and some who do not. Pat is a quilter and a lifelong artist; in fact, she taught art for over forty years.

Pat has donated four stunning quilts for the Quilt Alliance contests, one each year since 2009 (see the Tiny Desk Exhibition of these quilts below).  And as a member, she has volunteered to help with Alliance events like greeting guests in our contest quilt exhibition at the AQS quilt show in Paducah. Thank you, Pat and all our members, for supporting the work that we do, contributing your story and your quilts to our documentation, and for caring deeply about preserving the tradition of quilting for future generations.

When Pat heard the news that she’d won this bonanza of Aurifil thread she said, “I am so excited to have won the suitcase of Aurifil. I never thought I would be the winner of such a wonderful prize. I am guilty of sometimes using cheap thread in the past, but will certainly feel like a queen using such fine Aurifil thread.  I do believe in the work and projects of Quilt Alliance especially that of telling and keeping quilters’ stories. I have learned so much from this organization and enjoy the annual small quilt auctions. It is impressive to see each quilter’s design and special interpretation of the yearly theme.”

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And after Pat received the thread suitcase, she told us: “It is one thing to be excited about winning the thread, but to sit and hold the Aurifil thread collection in my hands is a dream come true!”

Here is a Tiny Desk Exhibition (love those NPR Tiny Desk Concerts) of Pat’s Alliance contest quilts from 2009-2012. Click on the link below each quilt to see materials and techniques used in each quilt and to read and hear Pat’s artist statements. These quilts are also documented in The Quilt Index, along with all Quilt Alliance contest quilts (you can browse them here).

CrazyforQuilts_PatriciaAnnHobbs

For the 2009 contest, “Crazy for Quilts”
24. “Elements of a Homestead (3rd place, Ages over 30)”
Patricia Ann Hobbs
Macomb, Illinois
Click here for materials & techniques and artist’s statement

NewfromOld_HobbsPatricia

For the 2010 contest, “New from Old”
09. “Blessings of Plenty be Upon You”
Click this link
to view materials & techniques and artist’s statement for this quilt.

2011 contest, “Alliance: People, Patterns, Passion17. "Recycle/Repurpose"Patricia Ann HobbsMacomb, IllinoisFast to fuse, found objects, machine applique, oil pastels, machine quilted.My passion for over forty years has been teaching art, but that also includes collecting odd found objects – lots of them (the bane of my husband’s existence). Making something out of “nothing” is the challenge. One of my favorite artists was Robert Rauschenberg, the father of recycling. The patterns on this quilt are created with the repetition of similar little pieces or colored objects. People? Number one is my husband of 44 years.

For the 2011 contest, “Alliance: People, Patterns, Passion
17. “Recycle/Repurpose”Materials, Techniques”
Click this link to view materials & techniques and artist’s statement for this quilt.

Home_PatriciaHobbs

For the 2012 contest, “Home Is Where the Quilt Is”
01. “The Piece Maker’s Child” (Honorable Mention)
Click this link to view materials & techniques and artist’s statement for this quilt.

 

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

On this Day in History Quilts 2013: January 17

Born in Oak Park: Betty and Another Beauty
On this day in 1922 American actress, comedian, author, singer and personality Betty Marion White Ludden was born in Oak Park, Illinois. White’s family moved to Los Angeles, California during the Great Depression, and in high school in Beverly Hills, White discovered her love for acting after taking the lead role in a play she wrote for a graduation day play. Three months later she had her first television job, singing songs with a classmate on an experimental LA station.

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This Log Cabin quilt was made by Rebecca Mason Grant of Oak Park, Illinois in 1885. The top is hand pieced silk velvet and satin. A relative of the quiltmaker documented the quilt during the Iowa Quilt Research Project in 1988.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betty_White

Quilt Index partners

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org