Gifts from Rocky Mount

On This Day in History Quilt for February 28:
On this day in 1964 American jazz pianist and composer Theonious Sphere Monk was featured on the cover of Time magazine. Monk’s unorthodox approach to piano and unique improvisational style made him the second-most recorded jazz musician (after Duke Ellington). Monk was born in Rocky Mount, North Carolina in 1917, but moved with his family to New York City at the age of 5.

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This quilt was also born in Rocky Mount. Annie Bryant made this scrappy Log Cabin in 1925. She hand pieced and hand quilted it with cotton, wool and linen fabric and wrote the recipient, her granddaughter’s initials in ink. The quilt was documented by Bryant’s granddaughter in 1986 during the North Carolina Quilt Project, who said, “She just wanted to give us something.”

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/thelonious-monk-makes-the-cover-of-time-magazine
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thelonious_Monk
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hIkmNNmAnAM

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Arpillera

On This Day in History Quilt for February 27:
On this day in 2010 an earthquake measuring 8.8 on the Richter scale hit off the coast of central Chile killing over 500 people and injuring thousands. The quake spawned a tsunami that damaged coastal towns in Chile as well as minor damage in California and major damage to a fishing village in Japan. It was the sixth largest earthquake ever to be recorded by a seismograph.

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This 18” x 14” machine pieced, appliqued and embroidered wall hanging titled “Arpillera” was made in Chile around 1980. The word arpillera means burlap fabric in Spanish, and is used to describe the complex tapestries (and in this case a pieced and embroidered textile) created by women in protest of the Augusto Pinochet dictatorship. The narrative textiles describe the harsh effects this regime had on Chile and its people.

The quilt was documented by John Beck, staff member of the Michigan State University Museum who purchased it from Madame Letellier, who was teaching at the University of Michigan at the time. Letellier is the widow of Orlando Letellier who was assassinated by the Pinochet regime in Washington D.C. in 1976. The piece tells the story of a strike by the professionals’ union (professors, engineers, etc.) in Chile.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_Chile_earthquake  
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_27
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Letelier_case
http://www.coha.org/chilean-women%E2%80%99s-resistance-in-the-arpillera-movement/

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Creole Creativity

On This Day in History Quilt for February 26:
On this day in 1928 the R&B and rock and roll pianist Antoine Dominique “Fats” Domino Jr. was born in New Orleans. The youngest of eight children in a Creole family, Fats was inspired to become a musician by his father, a well-known violinist and his uncle, a jazz guitarist. Fats, who started playing professionally in honky-tonks at the age of 10, went on to sell an estimated 65 million records worldwide.

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Irma Nicholas St. Pe’ of Creole and Czech heritage, made this Patchwork Strip quilt in 1952 in Louisiana. It was documented by her grandchild during the Louisiana Quilt Documentation Project. “My grandmother was very proud of her work. She was always sewing or cooking. She was really excited about the backing material on this quilt. She made good lemon pies and cakes. My grandmother always liked to primp-up! She always wore lip-stick and earrings when going somewhere.”

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/fats-domino-is-born-in-new-orlean
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fats_Domino

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Inspiration!

Outrageous Embellishments

   Frances Holliday Alford

Screen Shot 2013-02-25 at 12.35.35 PMI enjoy making my Outrageous Embellishments pieces.  The collection of materials is part of the fun.  This week I have been making a small piece for a close friend with a February birthday.
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Purple is her favorite color and amethyst is the birth stone for the month, so color choice is easy.
Screen Shot 2013-02-25 at 12.35.56 PMI start with a very stiff interfacing such as peltex or other non-woven material  If you cannot find a stiff enough piece, use two layers.
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I like to use a background fabric which is opposite on the color wheel from the chosen color.  Most of it does not show, but there seems to be more life in the piece when the small glints of bright color show through.

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I baste a piece which is a little larger than the interfacing piece.  This piece is 12×20 with a yellow orange background fabric.

Chosing the embellishments for the piece is by intuition.

I like to use some Austrian crystal, some nicer glass beads, mother of pearl buttons, and some seed beads.

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I also like to use plastic pieces, often from children’s toys , buttons, or jewellery.  Toys or sparkle pom poms work well.

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If you have a Venus of Willendorf lying around, use her too.
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Sew each piece down separately, using at least three strands of embroidery floss or a double strand of Silomide beading thread.  I use a sturdy large eyed embroidery needle for the larger objects.

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After the piece is completely covered, you can put a fabric backing on it.  I used purple violet floral  fabric because it is the birth flower forFebruary.
When you make any piece of art work, be sure to put a label on the back with your name and the date of completion.

 

Miracle on Ice

On This Day in History Quilt for February 22:

On this day in 1980 the United States hockey team defeated the Soviet Union team, four-time defenders of the Olympic gold medal in the event. Two days later the U.S. team performed a “miracle on ice” by beating the Finland team to earn an Olympic gold medal.
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Elsie Vredenburg of Tustin, Michigan made this quilt, titled “Ice Fantasia,” in 1989. The machine pieced and hand quilted piece is part of the Founders Collection of the National Quilt Museum in Paducah, Kentucky.  The quilt won Second place in the Theme category of the American Quilter’s Society Quilt Show in 1990.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/us-hockey-team-makes-miracle-on-ice

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

NASCAR!

On This Day in History Quilt for February 21:
On this day in 1948 the National Association for Stock Car Racing (NASCAR) was officially incorporated under the leadership of mechanic and auto-repair shop owner William Frances Jr.

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Clarice Sabina of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania made this quilt from NASCAR tee shirts in 2010. The extra shirts were sent to Iraq.  Sabina documented her quilt during the Western Pennsylvania Quilt Documentation Project.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/nascar-founded

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Postage Stamp

On This Day in History Quilt for February 20:
On this day in 1792 President George Washington signed legislation that would renew the 1775 act that made the United States Post Office a cabinet department led by the postmaster general (the first PG was Benjamin Franklin). This act ensured inexpensive delivery of all newspapers and stipulated the right to privacy, and it gave Congress the ability to expand postal services to new areas of the country.

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This Postage Stamp quilt top was hand pieced by Louisa Davis and hand quilted by Virginia Newman in 1840 in the Dewitt area of Michigan. Louisa’s great granddaughter, who documented the quilt as part of the Michigan Quilt Project, said “Louisa made this quilt top by candlelight during nights when she could not sleep.”

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/postal-service-act-regulates-united-states-post-office-department

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Airmen and Aeroplanes

On This Day in History Quilt for February 19:
On this day in 1942 the Army Air Corps’ 100th Pursuit Squadron was activated at Tuskegee Institute. The “Tuskegee Airmen” were the first African Americans called to serve as airmen in the U. S. military. Before this date they were denied training and opportunities due their race.

51-8C-2F6_2.19.13This hand and machine pieced and hand quilted cotton muslin quilt is titled “Aeroplane.” The maker is unknown; the owner inherited it and documented the quilt in 2004 during the Wyoming Quilt Project.

View this quilton The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.blackfacts.com/fact/950f3fdb-bde2-461c-82f2-2daa31b9eb66
http://www.tuskegeeairmen.org/

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Beloved patches of orange.

On this day in 1931 Nobel prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison was born Chloe Anthony Wofford in Lorain, Ohio, the second of four children in a working-class African-American family. Her 1987 novel “Beloved” set in post-Civil War Ohio includes this vivid reference to quilts:

Kneeling in the keeping room where she usually went to talk-think it was clear why Baby Suggs was so starved for color. There wasn’t any except for two orange squares in a quilt that made the absence shout. The walls of the room were slate-colored, the floor earth-brown, the wooden dresser the color of itself, curtains white, and the dominating feature, the quilt over an iron cot, was made up of scraps of blue serge, black, brown and gray wool–the full range of the dark and the muted that thrift and modesty allowed. In that sober field, two patches of orange looked wild–like life in the raw.

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This Nine Patch quilt was made by Catherine Miller Gingerich around 1880 in Iowa. The 68” x 79” quilt is hand and machine pieced and hand quilted and tufted. Old repairs are visible on the quilt with dark grey patches appliqued over worn areas of the top that have been quilted over in a teacup pattern. The quilt is part of the Illinois State Museum collection.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/toni-morrisons-birthday
http://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/736076-beloved
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beloved_%28novel%29

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Go Tell It at the Quilt Show! at QuiltCon

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If you are attending QuiltCon consider bringing a quilt with you to share with the world! Our new project, “Go Tell It at the Quilt Show!” is designed to capture the stories of quilts where quiltmakers gather. The formula for Go Tell It! is simple: one person talking about one quilt in front of one video camera for three minutes. Unlike our Quilters’ S.O.S. – Save Our Stories project where the interviewee must be a quiltmaker, the Go Tell It! interviewee profile is much broader.

Go Tell It! interviewees can be the maker of the quilt they bring to talk about, they can be the owner of the quilt, or they can tell the story on behalf of the quilt’s owner or maker. Maybe you’d like to tell the story of your first quilt, the history of a special family quilt, or one with a funny story. Whatever your motivation, every quilt has a story and we are eager to document, preserve and share that story for the education and inspiration of today’s quilt lovers and tomorrow’s historians and genealogists.

To reserve a time slot for your Go Tell It! interview, just sign up on this online schedule. On the sign up sheet, please add your full name and select up to 3 time slots that you would be available during the show to show & tell the story of your quilt. Then email us (qsos@quiltalliance.org) with your name and cell phone number so that we can notify you of any schedule changes during the show. We will then reply with day/time confirmation, information on what to bring with you to your Go Tell It! interview (your quilt!) and what you can expect. There is no charge to participate, but we hope that once you see this project, and all the work we’re doing to save quilt history, you’ll want to become a Quilt Alliance member.

During the show you can sign up for a Go Tell It! interview time slot by coming to the Quilt Alliance booth (#107). We have a limited schedule (Thursday-Saturday), so sign up today!

The Quilt Alliance launched the Go Tell It at the Quilt Show! project last year at the Original Sewing & Quilt Expo in Raleigh, North Carolina, . We were excited to partner with OS&QE along with Quilters’ Newsletter TV to pilot this video oral history project. Interviewees featured on this gorgeous video are Frieda Anderson, Sherri Driver, Tula Pink and Diana Bell-Kite.

The amazing creative team at Original Sewing & Quilt Expo have also conducted Go Tell It! interviews (watch the one below with quilter Dorenda Hubbard), and we also documented some wonderful interview sessions at other Alliance events in 2012 (those coming soon to the Quilt Alliance Youtube channel).

We envision this project as a grassroots oral history collection. In the next phase of development, quilt lovers everywhere will be invited to document the stories of quilts with equipment as simple as a cell phone and upload them to the Go Tell It! archives for all to see and remember.

Hope to see you at QuiltCon!