Water Witch

On This Day in History Quilt for March 1:
On this day in 1692 the Salem Witch Hunt began in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The first women put on trial were Sarah Goode, Sarah Osborne, and Tituba, an Indian slave from Barbados. All three were charged with illegal witchcraft, spurred by the testimonies of two girls in the colony who had experienced “fits” and other mysterious episodes that a doctor attributed to the effects of witchcraft.

50-8A-B76_3.1.13

Mary Margaret Berkley Watson of Point Pleasant, West Virginia hand pieced the blocks for this Water Witch quilt in 1889 (no obvious witchcraft involved). She was assisted by E.F. Berkley Thomas who helped “set up” the top in 1939 and L.B. Hogg and Mildred Hargraves who hand quilted the piece in 1948-49. The quilt was documented by the great niece of one of the makers during the West Virginia Heritage Quilt Search in 1992.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/salem-witch-hunt-begins

Quilt Index partners

Amy Milne headshot

Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

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This entry was posted in On this Day in History Quilts series and tagged , , , by quiltalliance. Bookmark the permalink.

About quiltalliance

The Quilt Alliance is a nonprofit 501c3 organization established in 1993 whose mission is to document, preserve, and share our International quilt heritage by collecting the rich stories that historic and contemporary quilts, and their makers, tell about our nation's diverse peoples and their communities. In support of this mission, the Alliance brings together quilt makers and designers, the quilt industry, quilt scholars and teachers, and quilt collectors to further the following goals: To promote the understanding of the quilt as an important grassroots art form. To make information about quilts available to a broad public. To educate the public about the importance of documenting quilts and quiltmakers so that their stories will not be lost.

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