Running Stitches.

On This Day in History Quilt for April 19.

On this day in 1897 the first Boston Marathon was run. The distance for the race was 24.5 miles. Fifteen competitors started the race and ten finished. Women were not allowed to enter the Boston race officially until 1972.

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Lyle Morehouse of Metarie, Louisiana, made this quilt, titled “A Reason for Running,” in 1980. Morehouse appliqued and pieced her old race t-shirts and hand quilted it together. Record notes include “She ran 15 marathons.” Morehouse documented the quilt in 2003 as part of the Louisiana Quilt Documentation Project.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/first-boston-marathon-held

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

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Quilts Help After the Quake.

On This Day in History Quilt for April 18.

On this day in 1906 the Great San Francisco Earthquake, estimated at nearly an 8.0 on the Richter scale, toppled numerous buildings and killed hundreds of people.

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This cheerful quilt titled “Bel peyizan lakay” was made by Haitian quiltmaker Denise Estava, whose partially constructed home was destroyed in the massive earthquake in Haiti in 2010. Estava was one of the founders a cooperative called PeaceQuilts set up to raise money for relief assistance through the sale of quilts like this one. You can purchase quilts from this group at their website: www.haitipeacequilts.org. The quilt is part of the Michigan State University Museum collection.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-great-san-francisco-earthquake

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

A Piece of Plymouth.

On This Day in History Quilt for April 17.

On this day in 1864 Confederate forces attacked Union troops in the village of Plymouth in eastern North Carolina near the Albemarle Sound. The Rebels took the city after four days of battle, but Union troops would recapture Plymouth later that fall. This was the second largest battle fought in North Carolina during the Civil War.

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This fragile Lone Star quilt was hand pieced, appliqued and quilted by Mary Rhodes between 1815-1840 in Plymouth, North Carolina. In 1947, Mrs. Alice Hoover Taft of Raleigh, N.C. donated the quilt to the North Carolina Museum of History, who contributed this record to the Quilt Index.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/battle-of-plymouth-north-carolina-begins
 

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

A Quilt for the Nurturers.

On This Day in History Quilt for April 16.

On this day in 1845, Mary Eliza Mahoney was born in Dorchester, Massachusetts. Mahoney was the first African American registered nurse in the United States. Her interest in nursing started in her teen years and she spent 15 years at the New England Hospital for Women and Children as a cook, janitor, washerwoman and unofficial nurse’s assistant. She was admitted to the hospital’s nursing program at age 33 and was one of four students (out of 42 who started the course) to complete the course. Mahoney was inducted into the Nursing Hall of Fame in 1978, fifty years after her death.

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Martha Rebecca Crider Posey of Franklin Parish, Louisiana hand made this quilt, pattern name unknown, in 1930 for her daughter Major Reber Lillian Posey of the U.S. Army Nurse Corps. The quilt traveled with Posey’s daughter to Europe and the Far East. Martha Posey’s great-granddaughter owns the quilt now and documented it during the Louisiana Quilt Documentation Project in 2002.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://womenshistory.about.com/
http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/partners/early/e_pioneers_mahoney.html

 

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Bravery and Batting.

On This Day in History Quilt for April 15.

On this day in 1947 Jack “Jackie” Roosevelt Robinson became the first African American player to join Major League Baseball, competing for the Brooklyn Dodgers. Robinson was born in Cairo, Georgia to sharecropper parents. In college at the University of California at Los Angeles, he was the first athlete in the school’s history to letter in four varsity sports—baseball, basketball, football and track. Robinson faced and protested against racial discrimination throughout his career. He retired from baseball in 1957 to work in business and continue his work as a civil rights activist. He died in 1972 at age 53.

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Mildred Beene Lee of Bridgeport, Alabama (born in Marion County, Tennessee) made this Baseball quilt around 1919 for her sons’ room. The quilt is hand and machine pieced in wool and cotton fabric and hand quilted with a thick batting for warmth. The quilt was documented during the Quilts of Tennessee project by the family member who inherited it.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/jackie-robinson-breaks-color-barrier

 

Quilt Index partners

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Quilt Around the Clock.

On This Day in History Quilt for April 12.

On this day in 1954 rock and roll pioneers Bill Haley and the Comets recorded “Rock Around the Clock” in only two takes. The final 40 seconds of the song includes a guitar solo performed by session guitarist Danny Cedrone was paid $31 for his work that night.

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Minnesota quiltmaker Michelle Fairchild made this quilt, titled “Give Thanks” for the 2011 Quilt Alliance contest. The mixed media quilt includes a working clock and is an homage to her fellow quilters: “This quilt is dedicated to all the Quilters and Designers from beginners to advanced to say “Thank You” for all your hard work…” Fairchild incorporated tools and concerns of today’s quiltmakers: a camera, quilt design software, reminders to make charity quilts, and even three little fairies to help out (because there’s never enough time)!

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/bill-haley-and-the-comets-record-quotrock-around-the-clockquot

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

All Homes Need Quilts. All People Need Homes.

On This Day in History Quilt for April 11.

On this day in 1968, U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson signed the Fair Housing Act, which prohibited discrimination concerning the sale, rental or financing of housing based on race, religion, national origin. Gender was added to that list of criteria in 1974 and people with disabilities in 1988.

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Gayle Simpson of Newbury Park, California made this small, house-shaped quilt, titled “All Homes Need Quilts,” in 2012 for the Quilt Alliance’s annual quilt contest. From Simpson’s artist statement: “We live in humble houses, high rise spaces, Brownstones, condos, trailers, apartment buildings, small houses, big houses and cars or shelters. Every home needs a quilt. I think this is why we donate so many community quilts from our Guilds. I learned to quilt so that I could make lasting art, and the most caring, special presents for friends and loved ones. We had no quilts when I was growing up. Ten years ago I found a baby quilt that an estranged Grandma had made for me. I had owned a quilt all along …and never knew it.”

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Sources:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civil_Rights_Act_of_1968

Quilt Index partners

Amy Milne headshot

Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org