Wild Goose Chase.

On this day in 1916, future car racing legend Louise Smith is born in Barnsville, Georgia. Smith was the first woman to be inducted into the Motorsports Hall of Fame. She was recruited for the fledgling National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing (NASCAR) circuit by a promoter named Bill Frances who was looking to attract new spectators by featuring a female driver. Smith was known locally for outrunning law enforcement and agreed to race at Greenville-Pickens Speedway in a 1939 Ford, finishing third.

Addie Sims Hardiman made this Wild Goose Chase quilt around 1905. The quilt was hand and machine pieced and hand quilted and is 74” x 78”. Hardiman made the quilt in Georgia, but it was documented during the Quilts of Tennessee project by the family member who inherited it.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/first-lady-of-nascar-louise-smith-born

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Singing Corners.

On this day in 1991, Italian tenor Luciano Pavarotti gave a free concert in London’s Hyde Park to celebrate his 30 years in opera. Because of a rainstorm, only 100,000 of the expected 250,000 spectators attended the concert. It was still the biggest turnout at Hyde Park since the Rolling Stones performed there in 1969.

Minnie Carter Martin, who worked days ‹in a lumber mill, handmade this quilt in 1932 in Knoxville, Tennessee. The pattern name is called Swallow’s Nest, alternately called Turkey Tracks or Singing Corners. Martin made the quilt for her great niece, who documented the quilt during the Quilts of Tennessee project.

Detail view.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Source:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/july/30/newsid_2491000/2491731.stm

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

The Space Quilt.

On this day in 1958, the United States Congress passed legislation formally inaugurating the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). One year earlier the Soviet Union launched the first satellite into orbit around the earth, causing U.S. officials embarrassment and resolve to create a focused and organized space program.

Sue Nickels and sister Pat Holly, both of Ann Arbor, Michigan, made this machine pieced, appliqued and quilted piece, titled “The Space Quilt” in 2004. The quilt is part of the Founder’s Collection of the National Quilt Museum in Paducah, Kentucky, and won the Bernina Excellence in Machine Workmanship Award in the 2004 American Quilter’s Society Quilt Contest. Visit Sue Nickel’s website to read about this quilt, a tribute to Sue and Pat’s father and a promotion of the U.S. Space Program.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/nasa-established

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Q.S.O.S. Spotlight

The Q.S.O.S. archives are full of stories about starting to quilt. It seems that everyone has a great story about how they “caught the quilting bug”. There are stories about learning the basics from family members, world-renowned teachers and even internet tutorials! But there are also many stories about teaching others to quilt–from daughters, to grandsons, to whole groups at a local guild or quilt shop. Today’s Q.S.O.S. Spotlight features two stories about helping future generations catch the bug!

Sandra McLeod of Texas says:

14-31-E8B-1-McLeodB“I am teaching my granddaughter to quilt. She’s eight. And we have finished two quilts now. I have her doing little blocks, I just pick up scraps from my quilt room, and I make strips a certain width . I have her sew two together, and then a fat strip on the end. We just put it in rows, and it’s just cute. Then, she picks out the border . Now, I’ve got her working on a charity quilt. Now, her seams aren’t always straight, but she likes to turn on the television while she’s working. So, she looks up at the TV at the same time she sews. So, those come out. But I don’t say anything to her, I just take it out, and pretty soon I slip that to her again and say ‘sew this.’ I don’t get to play with her all that often, but I am hoping that this is teaching another generation the pleasure that I’ve had in this.”

Elaine Evans of Vermont shares a story about teaching a young visitor to the United States to quilt:

14-31-C75-1-VT05819-026Evans.a

“When I had an ESL [English as a Second Language.] student stay with me one summer,she came into the house and I took her into the bedroom. I said, ‘Well, this is your bedroom. There’s a hand-made quilt on your bed. I’d rather you didn’t eat on it or drink on it or anything like that, to mess it up and make it look terrible.’ She said, ‘Okay.’ She was a very nice young girl. She just loved the quilt. Of course, she said, ‘Do you have other quilts?’ I said, ‘Yes. Do you want to see them?’ She said, ‘Yes! They’re so pretty.’ She said, ‘Can we make one?’ I said, ‘Yeah, I think we can do that. What do you want to do?’ She said, ‘The maple leaves are so pretty, can we make a Maple Leaf?’ So we made a Maple Leaf that year. I showed her how to cut it. I showed her how to sew it. She sewed almost all of it. I did a few leaves for her. We got the squares all sewed together and we made a twin-sized quilt. She said, ‘Okay, do you want to tie it or do you want to quilt it?’ She said, ‘Your quilting is so pretty. Can we quilt it?’ [both laugh.] I said, ‘Yeah,’ but I said, ‘you’re going to have to quilt it, too. I’m not going to do it myself. You’re going to help.’ So she did and she sat there and she learned to quilt. She finished the quilt before she left, at the end of the six-weeks that she was here. She took it back home. Her mom was just flabbergasted. She said, ‘You taught my daughter how to quilt! That was just fantastic.’ A couple of weeks later, I got a package in the mail. It was all Japanese fabric. She had sent it to me because I had taught her daughter [Akiko.] how to quilt.”

Want to keep reading? You can see other stories about learning and teaching quiltmaking (and more!) at the Quilters’ S.O.S.- Save Our Stories page on the Alliance’s site.

EmmaParker

Posted by Emma Parker
Project Manager,  Quilters’ S.O.S.- Save Our Stories
qsos@quiltalliance.org

Liberian Star.

On this day in 1847, the Republic of Liberia, formerly a colony of the American Colonization Society, a group formed to return freed African American slaves to Africa, declared its independence. It was the first West African nation to become a democratic republic. Between 1822 and the American Civil War approximately 15,000 African Americans settled in Liberia.

Isabella Major of Monrovia, Liberia, made this Liberian Star, or Star of Bethlehem, in 1972. The owners of the quilt live in Flint Michigan, and documented the quilt, which was a gift to them, during the Michigan Quilt Project. According to the owners, the quilt was so special that “they put the quilt on their bed only on the anniversaries of their wedding and her mother’s death.”

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/liberian-independence-proclaimed

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Creative Assistance.

On this day in 1978, the world’s first “test tube” baby was born. Louise Joy Brown was conceived by her parents, Lesley and Peter Brown, via in vitro fertilization (IVF).  Brown’s younger sister Natalie was born four years later, becoming the world’s 40th IVF baby.

This Baby Blocks quilt is actually a wholecloth quilt made from pre-printed fabric and tied with red yarn. It was made in Connecticut by an unnamed quiltmaker between 1876-1900 and was documented in The Quilt Index as part of the Connecticut Quilt Search in 1996.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/worlds-first-test-tube-baby-born

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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Eye of the Tiger Lily.

I’m back from the Quilt Alliance’s Not Fade Away conference. I missed you, OTDHQ fans!

On this day in 1982, “Eye of the Tiger”* by Survivor hit the top of the U.S. pop charts. This hit from the third of five “Rocky” films (actor/director Sylvester Stallone) held top billing on the chart for 6 weeks. The first hit from the boxing series was “Gonna Fly Now (Theme from Rocky)*.”

*I apologize in advance for leaving these tunes to replay in your head all day!

Anna Lee Girard of West Virginia, hand appliqued, pieced and quilted this Tiger Lily (alternately named Meadow or Wood Lily) quilt in 1881. Anna Lee was a housewife in rural Mason county in the central part of the state, and purchased new fabric to create this quilt. The lucky family member who inherited the quilt documented it during the West Virginia Heritage Quilt Search in 1992.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to read more about it’s history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/quoteye-of-the-tigerquot-from-rocky-iii-tops-the-us-pop-charts

Quilt Index partners

Amy Milne headshot

Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org