Liberian Stars.

On this day in 1895, William Vacanarat Shadrach Tubman was born in Harper, Liberia. Tubman is known as the “father of modern Liberia,” serving as its 19th President. Tubman’s grandparents were part of a group of 69 slaves who were freed from slavery in Augusta, Georgia and sent to live in Liberia by Emily Tubman, a philanthropic woman.

This all-handmade quilt, titled “Liberian Star,” was made by Leona Johnson of Monrovia, Liberia in 1992. From the Quilt Index record: “The quilt was brought to Flint, Michigan by the maker’s sister’s son, Rev. Emmanuel Bailey. Emmanual goes to Monrovia, Liberia about every 6 months to see his relatives and to work on the building of an orphanage for the victims of war.” The quilt was purchased along with one other by Johnson for the Michigan State University Museum Collection.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
 
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Tubman


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Carolina Lily.

On this day in 1997, Lilian Leigh Eselgroth, was born in Durham, North Carolina to Amy Milne and Chris Eselgroth.

Mrs. Karl Schegel machine pieced, hand appliqued and hand quilted this 39” x 40” “North Carolina Lily with Flying Geese” quilt between 1850-1875 in Detroit, Michigan. The quilt was documented as part of the Michigan Quilt Project and is owned by the Detroit Historical Museum collection, one of the more than 250 historical societies and museums represented by quilts in the Index.

Happy Sweet Sixteen to my Carolina Lily, and Happy Thanksgiving to all!

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
Lily=Mom


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Sweet Carolines.

On this day in 1957, Caroline Bouvier Kennedy was born, daughter of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy. She was named after both her maternal aunt, Caroline Lee Bouvier Radziwill, and her maternal great-grandmother, Caroline Ewing Bouvier. Young Caroline inspired singer-songwriter Neil Diamond to write his hit song “Sweet Caroline,” first released in 1969.

Detail view.

This hand pieced and hand quilted Hexagon Star quilt made of silk, cotton and wool fibers was made by Caroline Middleton of Haddonfield, New Jersey in 1877. The quilt was documented during the Heritage Quilt Project of New Jersey and the provenance of the quilt is noted as “a family made Quaker quilt.”

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.biography.com/people/caroline-kennedy-204598


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Finding Wonderland.

On this day in 1862, mathematician Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (aka Lewiss Carroll) sent 10-year-old Alice Liddell a handwritten manuscript called “Alice’s Adventures Under Ground. Alice and her siblings, the children of one of Dodgson’s colleagues, loved to hear Dodgeson’s stories and insisted that he write them down.

This quilt was made by Susan Poliquin of Schertz, Texas for the Quilt Alliance’s 2012 “Home Is Where the Quilt Is” contest. Poliquin’s artist’s statement: “Throughout my childhood I remember reading fairy tales. Reading them had a way of taking me to another land and allowing me to become a part of something unearthly. It spurred my imagination and helped develop my creativity. Over the year, as adulthood and responsibilities set in, I got away from this. It was nice to revisit that part of my life, if only for a short time, through the making of this quilt.”

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/alice-in-wonderland-manuscript-is-sent-as-a-christmas-present


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

The Dance.

On this day in 1936, postmodern dancer and choreographer Trisha Brown was born in Aberdeen, Washington.  Brown founded the avant-garde Judson Dance Theater in 1962. She has collaborated with artists Robert Rauschenberg and Laurie Anderson, including the piece “If you couldn’t see me” (1984) danced entirely with her back to the audience.  Brown was the first female choreographer to receive the coveted MacArthur Foundation Fellowship “Genius Award.”

Barbara Kilbourn of Ann Arbor, Michigan made this 42” x 42” quilt, titled “The Dance,” in 1996 for the American Quilters Society Show in Paducah, Kentucky. The quilt is Kilbourn’s original design and was machine pieced and appliqued and machine quilted. Kilbourn documented the quilt as part of the Michigan Quilt Project.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.trishabrowncompany.org/index.php?section=36


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Q.S.O.S. Spotlight

There’s a lot to love about Thanksgiving: delicious food, the presence of family, the sharing of gratitude, the after lunch nap. But this week’s Q.S.O.S. Spotlight features one of my favorite parts of Thanksgiving: Turkey! From an aptly named quilt pattern to rework embroidery to a special international quilt swap, we’re celebrating all things Turkey today at the Quilt Alliance.

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 Marlene Feldt of Colorado shared her ‘Turkey Tracks’ quilt and a story about the origins of this pattern’s name:

“The quilt is Turkey Tracks. It’s a very popular, common pattern, except that it’s usually done in reds and yellows. I think basically reds. I’ve done it in browns. Turkey Tracks wasn’t the original name. It has sort of an interesting story. The original name was Wandering Foot. Apparently, nobody wanted their kids to have wandering feet, or their husbands to have wandering feet, or what have you. So the name was changed to Turkey Tracks somewhere along the line and that’s how I know it by of course.”

 

ImageThe border of Judith Robinette’s railroad-themed quilt was inspired by a boyhood memory of hitchhiking turkeys:

“I wanted to create the look of railroad tracks around three sides. A year or so ago a friend of mine, Orin “Bub” Kepper, who has since passed away, spoke at Winfield’s annual Railroad Day of his boyhood days with the railroad bisecting the family farm. He told how their turkeys would fly over the fence and get on the tracks. How, when the engines stopped and the men would climb down and shoo the turkeys off the track, a few turkeys would fly up on the cars and ride away to Washington [Iowa]. He said the railroad always claimed they returned all the birds on the return trip, but he just knew they enjoyed free turkeys for Sunday dinners. He also told how he and every other kid would place pennies on the tracks to be flattened by the next passing train. So, I decided to place a turkey and a penny on the tracks in Bub’s memory.”

 

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Olga Jean Christoper McLaren celebrated Texas with her Turkey red embroidered quilt:

“The embroidery is all in redwork called Turkey red. There were a lot of the early Germans who came to Texas that did this work. I thought it was unique to them until a friend gave me a book, “Red & White American Redwork Quilts” by Deborah Harding, that I learned the true history of redwork. And that this came from Europe. The old ideas were that people thought anything from Eastern Mediterranean countries was really from Turkey. This was the only fast red thread so it became know as Turkey red. It was available in America after 1829. [T]his quilt has a number of aspects and all about Texas. It has the early flags of Texas, and the Texas flag is the dominant part of the quilt. I think our state flag is one of the most appealing and beautifully designed of any flag. There are other aspects of the state such as the heroes of the state, places of historical interest, and all of the state’s symbols.”

Linda Poole of Pennsylvania shares the story of collaborating with a quilter in Turkey and discovering a quilt’s power to bring people together:

Image“This quilt was an exchange between twenty Turkish girls and twenty Americans and we each got to keep our block that we exchanged with our block mate from the other country and the American girls sent twenty floral blocks over to Turkey and they’re going to finish our blocks into little small quilts and the twenty blocks we received from Turkey we will finish into small quilts and I just finished curating an American-Turkish Quilt Exhibit… The label on the back is called “Sunrise, Sunsets” and I can read this: ‘This quilt began in Ankara, Turkey, with my friend Gunsu Gungor the designer/maker of the center square. The border and quilting were added by me. Our friendship will always be the sunrise and sunsets of my life, a constant joy.’ We are very, very good friends. I wished we lived closer, because there is a whole ocean between us… I think it [quilting] brought women together. In the last millennium, it definitely, there are so many guilds and groups. I want to say camaraderie again–it’s my word for everything. It’s a common–you can talk to people and not even know them and you can–Just look at us two we have a common friendship with someone in Turkey.”

You can read more quilt stories (with and without turkeys) on the Quilters’ S.O.S.- Save Our Stories page on the Quilt Alliance site.

EmmaParker

Posted by Emma Parker
Project Manager,  Quilters’ S.O.S.- Save Our Stories
qsos@quiltalliance.org

Lot in Life.

On this day in 1963, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th president of the United States was assassinated while traveling through Dallas, Texas. Kennedy was the youngest man elected President (at age 43) and the youngest to die in office (at age 46). J.F.K.’s favorite hobbies were sailing, swimming and football and among his favorite pets were ponies.

Retta Booher Holland of Grand Prairie, Texas (fifteen miles west of Dallas) pieced this Crossed Canoes quilt in 1957. Holland purchased the scraps for the quilt from a dress factory near her home for $1. Her daughter, Kathleen Holland McCrady, did the quilting and said about her mother: “She worked hard all her life, and perhaps enjoyed most the part of her life after they [she and her husband] retired from the cafe business. She sewed for others and worked in her church keeping the babies in the nursery. She was always busy, seemed happy with her lot in life, and made the best of her situation. She had 17 grandchildren.”

The quilt was documented during the Texas Quilt Search Project and is included in the book Lone Stars: A Legacy of Texas Quilts, Vol. II, 1936-1986, by Karoline Patterson Bresenhan and Nancy O’Bryant Puentes (Austin: University of Texas Press, 1990.) It was included in an exhibition by the same name at the International Quilt Festival, in Houston, Texas in November, 1990. Additional information about Retta Booher Holland and her daughter Kathleen McCrady can be found in Kathleen H. McCrady, My Journey with Quilts: Over 70 Years of Quiltmaking 1932-2003 (Austin: 2005).

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/john-f-kennedy-assassinated

http://georgewbush-whitehouse.archives.gov/kids/presidents/johnfkennedy.html


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org