Q.S.O.S. Spotlight

It’s hard to believe there are only 3 more days left in 2013! As this year winds down and we prepare for 2014, many folks are preparing their new year’s resolutions–those things we plan (or hope!) to do in the new year. Today’s Q.S.O.S. Spotlight is shining on quilter Jan Wildman’s interview, conducted 13 years ago in Houston, Texas. Jan’s touchstone quilt was a “resolution quilt” featuring her wishes for the new year. Jan shared her resolutions and the background of the quilt with interviewer Jana Hawley:

“I’ve brought this quilt, because it’s kind of special to me, even though I don’t consider it my best quilt. It’s special to me, because I made this quilt instead of making New Year’s resolutions in 1995. I had decided that every year I was making the same resolutions and then breaking them by, probably the end of January. So I saw this flying pig’s fabric, and it reminded me of the expression ‘when pigs fly.’ So these are all things in my life that I figured would happen when pigs fly. So I have about nine different centers of blocks, that have different sayings of things that I would like to have happen in my life, but probably aren’t very likely... In the top block it says ‘Enjoy exercising.‘ The next one is ‘Keep the house clean’ and then the next one is ‘Finish more quilts.‘ And those are all kind of self-explanatory. Then in the next row I have ‘Lose weight‘ and above it in little letters it says ‘If only it were as easy to lose, as my mind.’ I guess that’s rather self explanatory. In the middle of the quilt there’s a block that says ‘Cherish the miracles,’ and it has sea turtles on it. There’s a story behind that that I can tell a little later. And then there is ‘Remember birthdays and anniversaries‘ which I am absolutely horrible about, still. And then on the bottom row there is ‘Use more fabric than I buy,‘ another when pigs fly pipe dream there. [chuckles.] ‘”Cook nutritious meals for my family,’ and then the final one is ‘Have more time to rest, relax, think and dream.‘ And of all of the nine, that’s the one that I’ve gotten closest to doing. [laughs.]

[…] I think one thing about doing this for me, when I made it, it was kind of nice to get rid of the guilt of making new year’s resolutions each year, and I’m pleased that I no longer do that, because I did always feel guilt over them and now, I kind of, when everybody else is saying they’re making them, I just kind of laugh about that. I think you can make resolutions any time during the year, you don’t have to wait till New Year’s, and maybe if you just make one at a time you have a better chance of accomplishing them, than making an entire list. I think that’s what it’s done for me.”

Check out Jan’s interview on the Q.S.O.S. page to read about the special sea turtle block she made as a reminder to cherish miracles in her interview on the Quilt Alliance site. You can always read more quilt stories on the Quilters’ S.O.S.- Save Our Stories page, too!

EmmaParker

Posted by Emma Parker
Project Manager,  Quilters’ S.O.S.- Save Our Stories
qsos@quiltalliance.org

Advertisements

Quilts for the holidays.

I’m enjoying some quiet, and not-so-quiet-: ), family time this season. I hope you are too. The subject of the holidays comes up fairly regularly in our Quilters’ S.O.S. – Save Our Stories (Q.S.O.S.) interviews and I thought it would be fun to share images and excerpts from a few of my favorites with you. Please write in with your own favorites from the Q.S.O.S. collection. We’d love to hear from you!

Kay Butler, interviewed by Heather Gibson in Dover, Delaware on December 16, 2000 for the Delaware Q.S.O.S. sub-project.

Heather Gibson: Okay, tell me about the quilt you brought today.

Kay Butler: Okay, this is a Christmas Mystery Quilt. We had a Mystery Quilt planned to do in our guild. There were four girls in the group. We were to select the fabric that we wanted, place it in a brown bag, and then pass it on to the next person in the group. And the next person would do a little bit more work, and it’s sort of like a “round robin” idea. And so I started this endeavor with a visit to a quilt shop here in Dover called Rose Valley Quilt Shop. I bought all of my fabrics there, in the Amish Shop, from a very dear friend, Rachel Hershberger. And I had in my head that I wanted a Christmas design. Normally I’m a real purple-lover, a real purple fan. But I thought, ‘I’m going to break from tradition here. I’m going to force myself to think in a different color realm here.’ And I chose what you see here on the end is called the “zinger” fabric. A lot of the quilters will buy a zinger fabric, and they will pull from that zinger fabric the various colors that are in there, like the reds and the greens and the golds that you see. So I bought the fabric. And in the brown bag we also include a journal. Each lady includes a journal, and they write the story of their lives in the journal. And what’s taking place in their lives, if they’re having difficulty with that step of the project that they’ve been doing. And that also documents the quilt and tells a little bit more about the quilt. It was interesting.

Liz Joe interviewed by Herb Morehead in Houston, Texas on November 6, 2011 for the International Quilt Festival Q.S.O.S. sub-project.

Liz Joe (LJ): The quilt I brought to show today is called “Wise Men Still Seek Him”. I made it to enter into a contest but it was an art festival that was sponsored by our church with a Christmas theme. The name of the show was ‘The Manger, the Magi, and the Majesty of Christ’. Every piece of artwork that was entered had to fit one of those themes and I chose the magi, the wise men. I should say, this was an art show, not a quilt show. This is the fourth year in a row I’ve entered something. It’s always been the only quilt in the show.

Becky Goldsmith interviewed by Jana Hawley in Houston, Texas on October 23, 1999 for the International Quilt Festival Q.S.O.S. sub-project.

Becky Goldsmith (BG): This is a quilt that was designed to be published in a book that my partner and I wrote for That Patchwork Place. I made this quilt and it ended up being on the cover of the book.

Jana Hawley (JH): Oh my God. That’s impressive. Have you made lots of quilts?

BG: Yes I have. I started quilting in–I can’t remember the year–probably in 1986 when my youngest child was about– no, it would be 1985, because he was not quite a year old. We had moved. My husband had just gotten out of graduate school and we were poverty stricken. [laughs.] And we got bunk beds for the boys because Jeff kept trying to climb out of his crib. I thought he was going to kill himself. We bought these used bunk beds and I couldn’t go out and afford to just buy the whole matching sheet sets for the bunk beds, so what I did was–I thought to myself, ‘Well I’ll make quilts for these beds.’ That morning in the paper there was printed an article that said, ‘If you want to make a quilt, make it from scraps.’ [laughs.] So that’s what I did. I didn’t research this. I didn’t think it through. I just took it as a message on high to make these quilts. [laughing.] I used up all of the scraps I had ever accumulated from garment making because I had sewn and made garments through the years. My husband was so sweet. He helped me with the cardboard template because it said to make the templates out of cardboard. I made these really long, skinny Drunkard’s Path quilts because I thought it would be easier to use on a bunk bed. They were non-functional. It’s a bad plan for a bunk bed. Quilts have a drop on the side for a reason. I didn’t know that then. [laughing.] After that, my mom got a quilt book and I borrowed it from her then I took a class. From then on, it was much easier.

Resna Ximines Hammer interviewed by Evelyn Salinger in Washington, D.C. on September 27, 2005 for the Daughters of Dorcas Q.S.O.S. sub-project.

Evelyn Salinger (ES): Good. Nice of you to come today with your things to show. Let’s start out first with your telling me what you have made here.

Resna Hammer (RH): These are two–One of the things that I am actually very passionate about is Jewish ceremonial kinds of cloths. And this is called a Challah cover and it’s used to cover bread on the Friday night dinner. This particular one also I tried to incorporate all of the holidays that would come in the certain period of time. Here this is Hanukkah, this is the symbol for Hanukkah, this is Purim, which is another one, and the pomegranates are for the High Holy Days.

ES: Do you actually use this on Friday nights yourself?

RH: We actually use it on Friday nights.

ES: Every Friday night or just on the holiday time?

RH: Just on the holiday. I have another one for Friday. I believe that the table should be beautiful. And normally what your traditional Challah covers are usually silk and they are painted on and I thought what I wanted to do and what I’ve been doing, a wonderful quilted ones that I just think enhance the day and the ceremony. This also has incorporated in it the seven species, which is in the Bible and that are things that are all incorporated with Shabbes or to do with the Sabbath. What I’ve written here in Hebrew is, it’s like, ‘For all the Miracles that You Perform for Us,’ and ‘We Thank You.’ I wanted it every Friday night to be able to see that.

If you share the Quilt Alliance’s belief that all quilts and quiltmakers deserve a spot in history, please make a contribution today to add the financial fuel we need to continue and grow. You can make a secure gift online via credit card or Paypal or download our mail-in donation form here.  Every dollar donated through December 31, 2013 will be matched by an anonymous foundation, up to $15,000.

If your are a member of this Alliance, if you have attended one of our events, if you believe in what we are doing, please make a contribution. Any amount makes a difference.

With gratitude and love,

Amy signature_firstname only

Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

What Does a Nonprofit Need Most?

Yesterday, the Quilt Alliance published it’s Video Annual Report for 2013 (watch below). I love working on this project every year because I get to see not only how much we’ve accomplished and where we’ve been, but especially who we are. This Alliance includes quiltmakers, quilt owners and collectors, quilt historians, quilt shop owners and staff, museum and historical society folk, quilt industry representatives, archivists, teachers, lecturers, oral history buffs (to name a few), and our love of quilts and commitment to quiltmakers brings us together.

Leading off our video annual report is the voice of longtime Alliance member Michelle Flamer, a quiltmaker and an attorney from Philadelphia. In the video, Michelle reads the artist’s statement for her TWENTY contest quilt, titled “Blest Be the Threads that Bind.”

Whether we are old, young, black, white, “plain,” “English,” rich, poor, or quilt traditional or modern, we are all quilters united by that desire to create something wonderful from a lifeless pile of fabric! Blest Be the Threads that Bind celebrates Quilt Alliance’s twenty years of service to the American quilting community, a community that transcends time and endures even now in the 21st Century.

75.MichelleFlamer

75. “Blest Be the Threads that Bind”
Michelle Flamer
Wynnewood, Pennsylvania

Our members and the people we document through Quilters’ S.O.S. – Save Our Stories (Q.S.O.S.) and Go Tell It at the Quilt Show! interviews, and our partners and contributors with whom we work on the Quilt Index project, come from every corner of the quilt community. That diversity is what every nonprofit needs most. It is our mission to document, preserve and share the full spectrum of what has and is happening in the quilt community today, and having members and supporters with unique perspectives in this community and different gifts to share, fuels our mission.

This year, we started the year by documenting quiltmakers at the Modern Quilt Guild’s first “QuiltCon” in Austin, Texas and finished the year at the 39th annual (!) Houston International Quilt Festival, documenting exhibiting quiltmakers and sharing our mission with attendees. Thanks to the leadership of both of these shows for supporting our mission!  Our staff and board members also made presentations and collected interviews at guilds and quilting events all over the United States, including our own Not Fade Away Conference in Herndon, Virginia in July and our Quilters Take Manhattan event in September.

We end our 20th anniversary year feeling energized by this Alliance of passionate members, volunteers, partners and colleagues, and we ask for your help raise the necessary funds to continue our work, to continue to document, preserve and share the history of our community.

Please make a contribution today to add the financial fuel we need to continue and grow. You can make a secure gift online via credit card or Paypal or download our mail-in donation form here.  Every dollar donated through December 31, 2013 will be matched by an anonymous foundation, up to $15,000.

If your are a member of this Alliance, if you have attended one of our events, if you believe in what we are doing, please make a contribution. Any amount makes a difference.

With gratitude and love,

Amy signature_firstname only

Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

G.I. Blues.

On this day in 1957, Elvis Presley received his first draft notice for the United States Army. He had just purchased his Memphis, Tennessee mansion, “Graceland,” and took one deferment while he finished working on the movie “King Creole” before being sworn in as an army private on March 28, 1958. Elvis spent 6 months in basic training and then served 18 months in Company D, 32nd Tank Battalion, 3rd Armor Corps in Friedberg, Germany, before being discharged on March 2, 1960.

Emma R. Davis of Huntington, West Virginia hand made this red, white and blue Original Military Design quilt in 1945 for her grandson who was in the service in World War II.  Davis, who had one daughter, was a homemaker from Pennsylvania who owned a grocery store chain. One of Davis’s relatives documented the quilt during the West Virginia Heritage Quilt Search in 1992.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/elvis-presley-is-drafted


Quilt Index partners

Amy Milne headshot

Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Lily Hockey and Friends.

On this day in 1917, the National Hockey League opened its first season with Montreal beating Ottawa and Toronto.

Lily Hockey, Edith Waterhouse and Olive Sagendorf hand pieced this Scrap YoYo Quilt between 1930-1949 in Guernsey, Channel Island in the United Kingdom. The quilt was documented by its owner during the Connecticut Quilt Search Project.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/national-hockey-league-nhl-opens-its-first-season


Quilt Index partners

Amy Milne headshot

Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Shock Waves.

On this day in 1976, American-born artist Man Ray (born Emmanuael Radnitzky) died in Paris at the age of 86. Man Ray is best known for his aveante-garde fashion and portrait photography, but he considered himself primarily a painter. He was part of the Dada and Surrealist movements and like his contemporary, Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray was interested in depicting movement in figures.

Ann Johnston of Lake Oswego, Oregon, made this quilt, titled “Shock Waves,” in 1996. It is hand-dyed and embellished and machine pieced and quilted. Johnston donated the quilt to the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum for the “Rooted in Tradition: Art Quilts from the Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum” collection.  A note on design in this Quilt Index record reads: “random lines: straight and curved, emphasizing line and movement, heavy amount.”

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man_Ray


Quilt Index partners

Amy Milne headshot

Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

A Plane, Some Bikes and a Lone Star Quilt.

On this day in 1903, in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Ohio natives Orville and Wilbur Wright made the first successful flight of a gasoline-powered, propeller-driven biplane. The first flight lasted 12 seconds and covered 120 feet. The Wright’s day job back in Dayton, Ohio was building, selling and repairing bicycles.

This Lone Star quilt was pieced by [unknown first name] Smith and quilted by Margaret Shuping from Dayton, Ohio in the 1940’s. The current owner of the quilt documented the quilt during the North Carolina Quilt Project in Hendersonville, N.C. in 1985.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/first-airplane-flies


Quilt Index partners

Amy Milne headshot

Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org