Q.S.O.S. Spotlight

Today’s Q.S.O.S. Spotlight is shining on Teresa Alvarez of Boonville, California. Teresa was interviewed as part of the Los Hilos de la Vida Q.S.O.S. Project, which interviewed members of the mostly Latina ‘Lost Hilos de la Vida’ (Threads of Life) quilt group in Boonville, California.

In her interview, Teresa explained the significance of her quilt–only the fourth one she’d ever made–and the importance of quilting in her life.

“It is a work. We came to learn to quilt. We learned that we could do a lot of things. We learned how to draw, how to sew better. Learn how to express how one has lived, and what has happened to us and what is past…This quilt represents the border. So when somebody comes over the border they feel like they are in the dark. So, you come here having to better yourself, to get ahead. Tinkerbelle represents the light. The light represents–Tinkerbelle represents light and also the stars represent the light and of the home of the family to get ahead.”

 

 

Karen Musgrave, interviewer: So what do you think of the group… Why is quilting important to you?

“It gives us good opportunities. To learn art, to get rid of the stress of being in the house allthe time. To have something to relieve the house and being at work all the time. Talking with people. [It is important]To see what a person can do. What you are capable of.”

 

 

 

 

 

You can read more quilt stories from Los Hilos de la Vida and other quilters across the country on the Quilters’ S.O.S.- Save Our Stories page on the Quilt Alliance website.

EmmaParker

Posted by Emma Parker
Project Manager,  Quilters’ S.O.S.- Save Our Stories
qsos@quiltalliance.org

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Ode to Antonia the Astronomer.

On this day in 1866, American astronomer Antonia Maury was born in Cold Spring, New York. Antonia’s grandfather and uncle, John William and Henry Draper, were both pioneering astronomers and exposed the Maury’s children to science at a young age. Antonia graduated from Vassar College in 1887 with honors and went on to study at the Harvard College Observatory, where she worked as a “Harvard Computer” (a group of highly skilled women who processed astronomical data).

This quilt, titled “Austin Halley 86” was made in 1979 by Kathleen L. Briggs of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. From this record: “Designed as part of a series on astronomy. To commemorate Halley’s comet, which was visible in Austin, Texas, but not in Milwaukee. Each fill in section has a different design as an historical record of the comets.” The inscription on the quilt includes the exact time Briggs finished the quilt: 9:00 p.m. CDT 09/02/86.  Documented during the Wisconsin Quilt History Project.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antonia_Maury


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Rural Republican Roots.

On this day in 1854, the Republican Party was founded in Ripon, Wisconsin. The group, who were form members of the Whig Party (formed in 1854 to oppose President Andrew Jackson), wanted to establish a new part party to oppose the spread of slavery into the western territories. The first Republican president, Abraham Lincoln, was elected in 1860.

Mary Elizabeth Stark of Newburg, Iowa hand pieced and hand quilted this Ocean Waves quilt using sewing scraps between 1860-1890.  A relative of the quiltmaker documented the quilt in 1988 during the Iowa Quilt Research Project, who noted: “Mary Elizabeth was a pioneer in bringing Farm Bureau and Extension lessons to rural women. She was one of the first women active in Republican politics.”

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/republican-party-founded


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

March Madness.

On this day in 1966, Texas Western (now called University of Texas at El Paso) becomes the first college basketball team to win the “Final Four” with an all-black starting lineup. Until that moment, at the height of the civil-rights era, no major-college team had ever started five black players in an NCAA championship game.

This satin quilt, titled “Basketball Star Quilt,” was made in 1999 by Rae Belgarde of Brockton, Montana. The quilt is now part of the Michigan State University Museum collection and was included in an exhibition, “To Honor and Comfort: Native Quilting Traditions,” that traveled to several U.S. states and Canada from 1999-2004.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/texas-western-defeats-kentucky-in-ncaa-finals


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Stamp Act.

On this day in 1766, the British Parliament repeals the Stamp Act, the controversial law that forced colonists in America to buy a British stamp for all official documents they obtained. The stamp had an image of a Tudor rose with the word “America” and the French phrase “Honi soit qui mal y pense” (“Shame to him who thinks evil of it.”)

Hulda DeFogerty of Connecticut made this Postage Stamp quilt for her nephew Irving D. Skeel’s marriage to Mary O’Connell in Oswego, New York in 1880. The quilt is now part of the permanent collection of the New England Quilt Museum.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/parliament-repeals-the-stamp-act


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Born in Ireland.

On this day in 461 A.D., Saint Patrick, who was a Christian missionary, bishop and apostle of Ireland, died in Saul, Downpatrick, Ireland. Patrick was said to have baptized hundreds of people in one day and to have used a three-leaf clover to describe the Holy Trinity. The first St. Patrick’s Day parade took place in New York City in 1762, when Irish soldiers serving in the English military marched through the city.

Mary Carey Mungiven hand pieced and hand quilted this red and white Irish Chain Variation quilt in County Clair, Ireland probably after 1875. The record states that Mungiven was an immigrant and ran a boarding house for railroad builders in Ohio. The owner, who received the quilt as a gift, documented it during the Rhode Island Quilt Documentation Project in 1992.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/saint-patrick-dies


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Make Mine Mathematical.

On this day in 1988, Larry Shaw, a physicist at the San Francisco Exploratorium, led the first observance of Pi Day with staff and public marching around one of its circular spaces, then consuming fruit pies. The now annual celebration commemorating the mathematical constant π (pi) is observed on March 14 (or 3/14 in the U.S.) since 3, 1, and 4 are the three most significant digits of π in the decimal form.

Frances Boltz Woodward, made this Mathematical Star quilt around 1840 in Virginia. The hand pieced, appliqued and quilted piece is now in the permanent collection of the DAR Museum.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.exploratorium.edu/pi/


Quilt Index partners

Amy Milne headshot

Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org