Quick, Henry – The Flit!

On this day in 1904, Theodor Geisel, better known to the world as Dr. Seuss, the author and illustrator of children’s books as “The Cat in the Hat” and “Green Eggs and Ham,” was born in Springfield, Massachusetts. Before he started writing children’s books Geisel created artwork for a very successful whimsical ad campaign for Flit insecticide.

This quilt (detail view), titled “There’s a Bug in My Computer,” was made by celebrated quiltmaker Helen Kelley in 1978. The caption, “Quick, Henry — The Flit!” is hand quilted into the top, referencing the slogan for Geisel’s popular ads.

View this quilt on The Quilt Index to find out! Read more about its history, design and construction. Be sure to use the zoom tool for a detailed view or click the “See full record” link to see a larger image and all the data entered about that quilt.

Source:
http://www.catinthehat.org/history.htm


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Quilted Presidents.

Weary of the winter weather? I hope this parade of Presidential quilts will cheer you up on this Presidents Day! These quilts were made between 1917 and 2000 in Arizona, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, North Carolina and West Virginia.

Redwork Presidents Top By: Conway, Mr. & Mrs. Period: 1901-1929 Date: 00-00-1917 Contributor: Arizona Quilt Documentation Project

Presidents Top By: Poston, Irene Period: 1976-1999 Date: 1984 Location Made: Fairdale, Kentucky (KY) USA Project Name: Kentucky Quilt Project Contributor: University of Louisville Archives and Records Center

Presidents’ Profiles Top By: Ferrell, Hazel B. Quilted By: Ferrell, Hazel B. Period: 1976-1999 Date: 1974 Location Made: Meddlebourn, West Virginia (WV) Project Name: Michigan Quilt Project Contributor: Michigan State University Museum

The Presidents Pattern Names: None Top By: Hoyt, Melba Quilted By: Hoyt, Melba Date: 2000 Location Made: United States Project Name: Louisiana Quilt Documentation Project Contributor: Louisiana Regional Folklife Program, Tech University

Presidents Quilt Pattern Names: President’s Quilt Top By: Adams, Mary Quilted By: Adams, Mary Period: 2000-2025 Date: 2009 Location Made: St. Peter, Minnesota (MN) United States Project Name: Minnesota Quilt Project Contributor: Minnesota Quilters Inc.

Unknown, President’s Silhouettes Applique Quilter Group: Greene County Home Extension Group Period: 1950-1975 Date: 1974 Location Made: Snow Hill, North Carolina (NC) United States Project Name: North Carolina Quilt Project Contributor: North Carolina Museum of History

BiCentennial Presidents Commercial Sources: Good Housekeeping Pillow kit and original center block Top By: Tippin, Loma Viola Quilted By: Tippin, Loma Viola Period: 1976-1999 Date: 11/1975 Location Made: Harrison, Michigan (MI) Project Name: Michigan Quilt Project Contributor: Michigan State University Museum

Our Presidents, Flag Quilt/ Original Top By: Mielke, Martha Period: 1930-1949 Date: 1930s Location Made: Unknown Project Name: MassQuilts Contributor: Massachusetts Quilt Documentation Project – MassQuilts

 

You can Browse and Search more fascinating quilts in The Quilt Index at www.QuiltIndex.org Watch a video tutorial on using the Browse by Pattern feature in The Quilt Index here:


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Thirteen Quilts–Lucky Us!

The Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan is one of forty museums who have contributed quilt records to The Quilt Index as part of the Michigan Quilt Project (see a complete list here with links to quilts in each collection).

Included in the Henry Ford permanent collection are thirteen quilts made by Susan McCord (1829-1909), “…an ordinary Indiana farmwife with an extraordinary genius for quilt making.”

McCord’s quilts range in style from crazy quilts to an intricate hexagon mosaic to an original design of thirteen hand appliqued strips of vines. This text is included in all of McCord’s quilt records:

McCord, like other thrifty housewives of the era, sewed her quilts from fabric she had on hand, mostly clothing scraps. Her everyday life was filled with household and farm chores; her “scraps” of leisure time were filled with masterful quilt making. Susan and her husband Green McCord farmed an eighty-acre farm in McCordsville, Indiana. Here Susan McCord kept house, brought up her children, sewed clothing for her family, knitted accessories, practiced homeopathic medicine, read her bible through each year, participated in sewing bees, gardened, took care of the cows and chickens–and found time to make at least thirteen extraordinary bed quilts. McCord used traditional materials, techniques and patterns—but her considerable skill at manipulating fabric, color and design turned the traditional into something exceptional. McCord’s bed coverings stand as the extraordinary legacy of an otherwise little-known Indiana farmwife.

McCord Vine Quilt Top By: McCord, Susan Noakes Quilted By: McCord, Susan Noakes Period: 1876-1900 Date: 1880-1890 Location Made: McCordsville, Indiana (IN) United States Project Name: Michigan Quilt Project Contributor: Michigan State University Museum

Detail of McCord Vine Quilt

 


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Wednesday Weathervanes.

Weathervane is one of more than 200 Browse by Pattern categories users can select to Cruise & Use the Quilt Index. Here are four of the 22 Weathervane quilts that I browsed.

My favorite (today): this machine pieced and hand quilted pink beauty by Ethel Tew of Lake Odessa, Michigan in 1945. The quilt was documented in 2005 as part of the Michigan Quilt Project.

You can Browse more Weathervane quilts in The Quilt Index here. Watch a video tutorial on using the Browse by Pattern feature in The Quilt Index here:


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Monday Morning Stars.

Just what the doctor ordered to light up your week—a half dozen Morning Star quilts documented in The Quilt Index spanning two centuries and six states. Enjoy!

Broken Star, Star of Bethlehem, Blazing Star Top By: Schrock, Amanda Mast Period: 1930-1949 Date: c. 1935 Location Made: Arthur, Illinois (IL) USA Contributor: Illinois State Museum

 

Star of Bethlehem variation Top By: Brooks, Mrs. Mary (Nancy?) Bird Period: 1800-1849 Date: c. 1813 Location Made: Kentucky (KY) USA Project Name: Kentucky Quilt Project Contributor: University of Louisville Archives and Records Center

 

Star of Bethlehem Top By: Maker, unknown Period: 1800-1849 Date: 1825-1850 Location Made: Unknown Project Name: MassQuilts Contributor: Massachusetts Quilt Documentation Project – MassQuilts

 

Broken Star; Blazing Star; Diadem Star; Star of Bethlehem Top By: Foster, Nellie M. Period: 1930-1949 Date: 1935 Location Made: Nebraska (NE) USA Project Name: Nebraska Quilt Project (Lincoln Quilters Guild) Contributor: University of Nebraska – Lincoln

 

Lone Star Pattern Names: An Aesthetic Quilt, Star of the East, Star of Bethlehem, Blazing Star, Rising Star, Pride of Texas, Star of Stars, Rising Sun, Overall Star Pattern Top By: Mayborn, Bessie Estella Jackson Quilted By: Mayborn, Bessie Estella Jackson Period: 1901-1929 Date: 1925 Location Made: Laramie, Wyoming (WY) United States Project Name: Wyoming Quilt Project, Inc. Contributor: Wyoming Quilt Project, Inc.

 

Lone Star Pattern Names: Star of Bethlehem; eight-pointed star; Gwyer Family Quilt Top By: Gwyer, Sarah Hall Period: 1850-1875 Date: ca. 1860 Location Made: New York (NY) USA Project Name: Permanent Collection Contributor: DAR Museum

 

You can Browse more Morning Start quilts in The Quilt Index here. Watch a video tutorial on using the Browse by Pattern feature in The Quilt Index here:


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Posted by Amy E. Milne
Executive Director, Quilt Alliance
amy.milne@quiltalliance.org

Q.S.O.S. Spotlight

Tonight is the seventh night of Hanukkah, and Christmas is only three days away–we’re right in the middle of a season of giving. Whether it’s new gadgets and gifts to friends, quilts for family, or a donation to an organization near and dear, there will be a whole lot of giving going on this week!

Today’s Q.S.O.S. features 4 quiltmakers on giving. What do you plan on giving this year?

14-31-97E-1-qsos-a0a9n9-a_15370Violette Denney, interviewed in Carollton, Georgia: In all I have made about 189 quilts. I do keep a log of my quilts and I probably have less than 100 still, so those others I’ve given away. So I’ve given lots of quilts away. And that doesn’t count the quilt tops that I’ve made, I did five for the DAR that were quilted by someone else and used as fund-raisers. We’ve made many, many for the children’s home, we’ve made them for Kosovo and troops and I did one for Merrill Gardens, the assisted Living Facility here in town. I did one for the Historical Society to be given to the city during the anniversary celebration and it’s hanging in City Hall [Carrollton, Georgia.] now. My daughter-in-law works for Home Depot and I did a quilt for her and it actually ended up in the Home Depot Museum. So, anyway I’ve done lots and given lots away, but I guess my favorite is giving them to the children. I gave 8 to hospice last year for the children patients at Heartland Hospice and made pillowcases with animal prints and all for them too. So I like to do things like that.

Judy Whitson of Tuscaloosa, Alabama: I love to give. It is a sign that you really care for somebody when you give them a handmade item like a little baby quilt or a quilt for their bed or something, and it is more or less a memory quilt. I always put a signature block on there saying who it is for, the date, and who designed it and who made it, quilted.

Judy Kriehn, at the International Quilt Festival in Houston saidI don’t have kids. I’m not married and I don’t have kids. All I have is fabric. [laughs.] I have three sewing machines and fabric. I had a lot of cousins who were having babies so I made baby quilts for them. I make a lot things that I give away and people are like, ‘How can you give that stuff away?’ Well because it’s personal even when it’s a baby quilt. It’s coming from my heart and I’d rather give it to somebody who is going to appreciate it than try to sell it and be unhappy no one wanted to buy it.

And I just love the way Sue Stinner in Elkton, Maryland talks about her grandchildren: Most of the quilts I’ve made though, I’ve given away. But know that I’m building up a stash of grandkids along with a stash of fabric; I’ll probably be making more for family than I will for friends. 

You can read more quilt stories on the Quilters’ S.O.S.- Save Our Stories page on the Quilt Alliance site.

EmmaParker

Posted by Emma Parker
Project Manager,  Quilters’ S.O.S.- Save Our Stories
qsos@quiltalliance.org

Q.S.O.S. Spotlight

Today’s Q.S.O.S. Spotlight is shining on a 2002 interview with Rosemary Zaugg, in Fort Worth, Texas. In her interview, Rosemary shared about the 30 year gap between her first quilt and her second, how she came to quilt-making (again), and her advice to new quilters. Read on for more words of wisdom from Rosemary:

My first quilt was when I was 18 and right out of high school. When I was 15 or 16, I made a list of things that I was going to accomplish in my life and one of the things on there was ‘piece a quilt.’ And so I took a cardboard shoe box and took some cardboard templates, I first went to see my dad’s cousin who had tons of quilt tops that she had made all her life. People brought her scraps and people in the town had given her scraps to make quilt tops and they’d come and she would sell the quilt tops and she had hundreds of them. So I went to visit her and I picked out a pattern and she gave me her templates and I had cardboard templates and I cut out all these triangles with the scissors. The pattern was supposed to be “Hope of Hartford but I got the pinwheels turned around, half of them, so I called it “Hope of Rosemary.” And I got the quilt finished, my mother put it on the frame, and she had her friends come and quilt it. And I was going to learn to hand quilt and I pricked my finger and it bled on the quilt and my mother said, ‘Honey, you can serve the lemonade.’ So I never learned to hand quilt because I was serving the lemonade. So I checked off on the list that I had made my quilt and it was quilted. And that was in 1964, and I never did a quilt again until 1994. […]

In 1992, I had a liver transplant and I could not go back to work as an accountant because I couldn’t–I wouldn’t have the stamina to take that many hours. I had done our daughters’ wedding–we had two daughters get married and a liver transplant in eight months and when that all was over with, I got bored. I couldn’t go back to work and I said, ‘I think I’ll piece a quilt.’ My husband said, ‘Well, why don’t you write a book?’ and I said, ‘No, I think I’ll piece a quilt.’ I got a quilt book and by the first time I had–by the first quilt I got done, I had three more cut out. And it was just my thing and I just got into it and I made thirty-two full-size or queen-size bed quilts. I’ve made over 180 quilts. I have paper-pieced 1500 blocks in wall hangings, jackets, and quilts and I’ve got a few unfinished projects […]

Edie Jones (interviewer): What advice, in parting words, would you give to new quilters?

Rosemary Zaugg: The first couple of years, I said, ‘There are quilters who talk about it and quilters who do it.’ I said, ‘Get out there and do it. Don’t just go to meetings and learn about it. Don’t go to classes and never make a quilt. Get out there and do it.’ And the vender booth Pastime Fabrics has this display and she’s got these quilter’s quotes out there, and as I walked past it yesterday, I pointed to the one and I said, ‘It says, She who dies with the most fabric wins.’ I said, ‘That’s not really true. She who dies with the most fabric is still dead, so get out there and use the fabric, make the quilts, don’t just collect the fabric.’

You can read more quilt stories on the Quilters’ S.O.S.- Save Our Stories page on the Quilt Alliance site.

EmmaParker

Posted by Emma Parker
Project Manager,  Quilters’ S.O.S.- Save Our Stories
qsos@quiltalliance.org